What to Do If You Don’t Climb the Rock

The Aborigines ask that we don’t climb Uluru, the iconic Rock that sits in the Red Centre of Australia. Why? Because it is a sacred place for the Aborigines. So, what do we do instead? Watch this short video to find out.

The Art of Not Climbing

For the adventurous types like myself, passing up the opportunity to climb such a beautiful form in nature may see disappointing. But, there are so many things to do instead, from riding camels to hiking and biking and immersing in Aboriginal culture. And, we watch the Rock from the ground, and feel good about ourselves for honoring traditions and showing respect.

Local guide Denni Russell of SEIT Outback Australia showed me a honey ants nest and taught me how Aborigines forge for sugar and feast on the bounty of the earth, from kangaroos to emus, grubs to honey ants, and shrubs to flowers. The diet has been good to them, gifting them strength, ingenuity, and endurance.

Later we head to the Maruku Arts Center, where an elder artist Alice Wheeler uses her hand to draw in the sand and demonstrates how the Aborigines used to tell their stories.

These are just a few of the many things you can do instead of climbing the Rock. In the end, you’ll see it’s worth it.

For more tips on exploring Australia, click here.

Comments

  1. Laurel Dunn says:

    Richard,

    Good for you, respecting the wishes of the native people of Australia!

    Laurel Dunn

  2. Gerolf Kretschmar says:

    I completely agree with the wishes of the Aboriginal tribe not to climb the secret rock. Twice I visited Uluru in 2007 and in 2014. I was perfectly in awe driving around the rock and looking at it from all angles. The photographs taken were just too numerous to count. I can only wish that the travel agencies stop promoting a rock climb. The German Visitor I had with me wanted to climb as well but then decided to only go up by 30 meter sand turned back. Three busses arrived shortly thereafter and each one from the bus climbed the rock. I was disgusted. I am 48 years in Australia and wherever I travel people mention Uluru; the rock is certainly world famous and I love it as well.